Recent News Items

Single Dose of Antidepressant Changes the Brain, by Janice Wood. Psych Central, September 19, 2014.  “Just one dose of an antidepressant is enough to produce dramatic changes in the brain, according to a new study. While SSRIs are among the most widely prescribed antidepressants worldwide, it’s still not entirely clear how they work, according to researchers. The drugs are believed to change brain connectivity, but over a period of weeks, not hours, researchers noted. The new study shows that changes begin to take place right away.”

Redefining Race Relations: It Begins at Home, by Erlanger Turner. American Psychological Assosciation, September 18, 2014.  “In the United States, race relations has had its challenges across history. Although strides have been made over the course of history, we continue to battle racism and injustice in the 21st century. The recent incident in Ferguson, Missouri has re-energized efforts to address race relations, racism, and discrimination. If you’ve been avoiding media or hiding from technology, CNN has provided information on their website detailing the events and current status.”

One In Five Workers Has Left Their Job Because Of Bullying, by Kathryn Dill. Forbes, September 18, 2014.  “Nearly one third of workers report having felt bullied at work, according to a study released today by CareerBuilder. Even worse? Roughly 20% ended up leaving their job because of it. The study is based on data from a nationwide survey conducted by Harris Poll of nearly 3,400 full-time, private sector employees throughout various industries and company sizes.”

World Suicide Prevention Day, 2014, by John Grohol. Psych Central, September 10, 2014.  “Every day around the world, families and friends grieve the loss of a loved one due to suicide. Not once. Not twice. But over 2,000 times per day someone takes their own life. Can you imagine? If Ebola took 2,000 people’s lives per day, we’d hear a world outcry and an immediate call to action. But since it’s just suicide, we turn a blind eye. We go on with our merry lives, and pretend it couldn’t happen to us. It couldn’t possibly happen to someone we know.”

10 Depression Myths We Need To Stop Believing, by Alena Hall. Huffington Post, September 03, 2014.  “In recent weeks, the global conversation surrounding death by suicide has taken center stage, and now more than ever, we're acknowledging the effects of undiagnosed, untreated and mistreated depression on those rising numbers. Approximately two out of three people who commit suicide suffer from major depression first. In the past, we have spent more time focusing on suicide than on this dominant root cause. And that's finally changing. Here are 10 myths and misconceptions about depression that hinder us from truly understanding the disease.”

Mental Health Care System Is Failing At Suicide Prevention, Advocates Say, by Alana Horowitz. Huffington Post, September 03, 2014.  “Nearly 40,000 people die from suicide in the U.S. every year -- a number that has climbed recently. CDC data show that in the first decade of the millennium, the suicide rate among U.S. adults rose 28 percent. As researchers told The New York Times last year, this figure may be even higher due to under-reporting. a pending piece of legislation in California that would mandate suicide prevention training for all licensed mental health professionals, including psychologists, social workers and even marriage counselors. Such a requirement is startlingly rare: Only two other states have laws similar to the proposed California bill, despite evidence that suggests such training can lower rates of suicide among at-risk groups.”

In our digital world, are young people losing the ability to read emotions?, by University of California - Los Angeles. ScienceDaily, August 22, 2014.  “Children's social skills may be declining as they have less time for face-to-face interaction due to their increased use of digital media, according to a UCLA psychology study.”

Postpartum Difficulties Not Just Limited to Depression, by Traci Pedersen. Psych Central, August 19, 2014.  ““Both mothers and fathers need to pay attention to their mental health during the perinatal period, and they need to watch for these other types of conditions, not just depression,” said Carrie Wendel-Hummell, a doctoral candidate in sociology. “Anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder, psychosis, and bipolar disorder are all shaped by circumstances that surround having a baby.””

Childhood mental health disabilities on the rise, by Val Wadas-Willingham. CNN, August 18, 2014.  “Over the past half century, the prevalence of childhood disabilities in the United States has been on the rise, possibly due to an increased awareness about these issues. Now a study published in this week’s online issue of Pediatrics suggests the nature of those newly diagnosed disabilities is changing. The report, “Changing Trends of Childhood Disability, 2001-2011" found the number of American children with disabilities rose 16% over a 10-year period. While there was a noted decline in physical problems, there was a large increase in disabilities classified as neurodevelopmental conditions or mental health issues, such as ADHD and autism.”

Duration of undiagnosed bipolar disorder unrelated to treatment response, by Joanna Lyford. August 06, 2014.  “The duration of undiagnosed bipolar disorder is unrelated to patients’ clinical status or their response to mood-stabilising medication, study findings indicate.”

It’s Not Just What You Say, It’s How You Say It, by Aimee Swartz. August 03, 2014.  “Even the savviest city dwellers would be lost in a maze of detours and one-way streets without navigation apps. But what about GPS for your mental health—technology that could navigate the peaks and valleys of bipolar disorder? Yep, there’s an app for that, too.”

New Research Shows Why Some People Are More Vulnerable to Stress, by Janice Wood. Psych Central, August 02, 2014.  “A new study may explain why some people are more vulnerable to stress and stress-related psychiatric disorders.”

Everything we think we know about being the child of divorce is wrong, by Danielle Teller, M.D. and Astro Teller. July 31, 2014.  “It is common knowledge that research studies have demonstrated the harmful effects of divorce on children. Surprisingly, that common knowledge turns out not to be supported by evidence. Although proponents of marriage would like us to believe that kids with divorced parents have more emotional, academic and psychological problems than they would have had if their parents had stayed together, no credible data exist to back up those claims.”

Preschool Depression May Continue for a Decade, by Rick Nauert. Psych Central, July 31, 2014.  “New research discovers early childhood depression increases the risk that a child will be depressed throughout their formative school years. Washington University researchers discovered children who had depression as preschoolers were 2.5 times more likely to suffer from the condition in elementary and middle school than kids who were not depressed at very young ages.”

Could a blood test predict suicides?, by Matthew Stucker and John Bonifield. CNN, July 30, 2014.  “Approximately 36,000 deaths are caused by suicide each year in the United States. What if a simple blood test could one day help prevent that from happening? In a new small study, researchers were able to predict who had experienced suicidal thoughts or attempted suicide just by looking at their blood. The experimental test was over 80% accurate.”

Brain cells can suppress appetite, study in mice shows, by Smitha Mundasad. BBC, July 27, 2014.  “Scientists have discovered a central hub of brain cells that may put the brakes on a desire to eat, a study in mice shows. And switching on these neurons can stop feeding immediately, according to the Nature Neurosciences report. Researchers say the findings may one day contribute to therapies for obesity and anorexia.”

Study: One in 10 Juvenile Detainees Have Contemplated Suicide, by Hing, Julianne. ColorLines, July 24, 2014.  “One in 10 youth locked up in juvenile detention has experienced suicidal thoughts in the last six months, according to sobering new findings published by the federal Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. The article is the latest installment in a series from the Northwestern Juvenile Project examining the mental health of youth at Cook County Juvenile Temporary Detention Center in Chicago.”

Thousands of prisoners treated for mental illness, by Johnson, Kevin. USA Today, July 24, 2014.  “The nation's largest prison system has spent more than $36.5 million on psychotropic drugs to treat thousands of offenders in the past four years, according to federal Bureau of Prisons data supplied to USA TODAY.”

Study: Financial Education Key For Domestic Violence Survivors, by Jeltsen, Melissa. Huffington Post, July 24, 2014.  “Marina A. has no bruises or scars from the abuse she suffered at the hands of her husband. That is, unless you look at her bank account. “My husband was in total control of the money,” she told The Huffington Post at a conference on financial abuse Wednesday. “At times, he let me have a debit card but he would tell me where and when I could use it. Other times, he would borrow it and 'lose' it, leaving me with nothing. I couldn’t drive. I had no money to call a cab. I was stuck.””

Bullying: Forget what your mother taught you, by Williams, Carol. Asbury Park Press, July 24, 2014.  “All those ways your mom taught you to deal with bullies — ignore them, walk away, turn the other cheek — they don't seem to work, experts say.”

Suicide survival stories must be told, says Australian mental health chief, by Davey, Melissa. The Guardian, July 23, 2014.  “Survival stories from those who attempt suicide should drive mental health interventions but have been missing from policy discussions, Australia’s national mental health commissioner has said. Prof Ian Hickie said this omission was partly because of society’s often callous view towards suicide”

Persistent Sleep Problems after Divorce Need Attention, by Rick Nauert, Ph.D. Psych Central, July 18, 2014.  “University of Arizona researchers have discovered that prolonged sleep problems after a divorce may be associated with hypertension. Experts cite a growing body of research that links divorce to significant negative health effects and even early death, yet few studies have looked at why that connection may exist.”

Why You Are So Stressed About Stress, by Anna Altman. New York Times, July 16, 2014.  “NPR conducted a study about how stressed out we are as a country, and the results, released last week, show that one in four Americans reported feeling stressed in the last month and one in two has experienced a major stressful event in the last year.”

Mayor Walsh Aims to End Homelessness Among Boston’s Veterans by 2015, by Zeninjor Enwemeka. July 09, 2014.  “The “Boston Homes for the Brave” initiative seeks to house 400 homeless veterans in the city, the mayor’s office announced today.”

How Childhood Trauma Could Be Mistaken for ADHD, by Rebecca Ruiz. The Atlantic, July 07, 2014.  “Considered a heritable brain disorder, one in nine U.S. children—or 6.4 million youth—currently have a diagnosis of ADHD. In recent years, parents and experts have questioned whether the growing prevalence of ADHD has to do with hasty medical evaluations, a flood of advertising for ADHD drugs, and increased pressure on teachers to cultivate high-performing students. Now Brown and other researchers are drawing attention to a compelling possibility: Inattentive, hyperactive, and impulsive behavior may in fact mirror the effects of adversity, and many pediatricians, psychiatrists, and psychologists don’t know how—or don’t have the time—to tell the difference.”

‘I’m a Survivor of Rape and Intimate Partner Violence–And I’m a Man’, by Kelly, John. Time, July 02, 2014.  “The topic of campus rape has been making its way to Congress and the White House, and coverage of this issue has increasingly been making headlines. But conspicuously absent from the conversation is the narrative of male and queer survivors.”

Divorce Can Impact Children's Weight, by Lauren Gaines. Parenting Magazine, July 01, 2014.  “Parents often worry about their children's emotional well-being when going through a divorce, but new research suggests they should be concerned for their physical health, too. A study published in the online journal BMJ Open found that children of divorced parents were more likely to be overweight or obese.”

Disclaimer: Material on the MSPP INTERFACE® Referral Service website is intended as general information. It is not a recommendation for treatment, nor should it be considered medical or mental health advice. The MSPP INTERFACE® Referral Service urges families to discuss all information and questions related to medical or mental health care with a health care professional.