Books and Articles — All Topics

General Publications

Articles and Other Resources

In our digital world, are young people losing the ability to read emotions?, by University of California - Los Angeles. ScienceDaily, August 22, 2014.  “Children's social skills may be declining as they have less time for face-to-face interaction due to their increased use of digital media, according to a UCLA psychology study.”

For New College Grads, Finding Mental Health Care Can Be Tough, by Maanvi Singh. NPR, June 04, 2014.  “For many young people, college graduation marks the entry into what grown-ups call "the real world." But if you're a new graduate with a mental health condition, the transition can be especially challenging. Many young people start managing their own health care for the first time when they graduate. And while finding and paying for a psychologist or psychiatrist can be difficult at any age, for young people who don't have steady jobs or stable paychecks, the task can be especially daunting. Perseverance and planning ahead help.”

More insured, but the choices are narrowing, by Reed Abelson. New York Times, May 12, 2014.  “In the midst of all the turmoil in health care these days, one thing is becoming clear: No matter what kind of health plan consumers choose, they will find fewer doctors and hospitals in their network — or pay much more for the privilege of going to any provider they want. These so-called narrow networks, featuring limited groups of providers, have made a big entrance on the newly created state insurance exchanges, where they are a common feature in many of the plans. While the sizes of the networks vary considerably, many plans now exclude at least some large hospitals or doctors’ groups. Smaller networks are also becoming more common in health care coverage offered by employers and in private Medicare Advantage plans.”

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Adoption

Books for Children and Teens

Kasza, KeikoA Mother for Choco
Katz, KarenOver the Moon: An Adoption Tale
McCutcheon, JohnHappy Adoption Day!
Rosove, LoriRosie's Family: An Adoption Story

Books for Adults

Eldridge, SherrieTwenty Things Adopted Kids Wish Their Adoptive Parents Knew
Gray, DeborahAttaching in Adoption: Practical Tools for Today's Parents
Schooler, JayneSearching for a Past: The Adopted Adult's Unique Process of Finding Identity
Van Gulden, HollyReal Parents, Real Children: Parenting the Adopted Child

Articles and Other Resources

Orphans' Lonely Beginnings Reveal How Parents Shape A Child's Brain, by Jon Hamilton. NPR, February 24, 2014.  “Parents do a lot more than make sure a child has food and shelter, researchers say. They play a critical role in brain development. More than a decade of research on children raised in institutions shows that "neglect is awful for the brain," says Charles Nelson, a professor of pediatrics at Harvard Medical School and Boston Children's Hospital. Without someone who is a reliable source of attention, affection and stimulation, he says, "the wiring of the brain goes awry." The result can be long-term mental and emotional problems.”

Overseas adoptions rise-for black American children, by Sophie Brown. CNN, September 17, 2013.  “While the number of international adoptions is plummeting -- largely over questions surrounding the origin of children put up for adoption in developing countries -- there is one nation from which parents abroad can adopt a healthy infant in a relatively short time whose family history and medical background is unclouded by doubt: The United States.”

Adopted children at greater risk for mental health disorders, by Madison Park. CNN, April 14, 2010.  “Children who are adopted may be at elevated risk for mental health disorders, such as attention-deficit/hyperactivity, oppositional defiance, major depression and separation anxiety disorders, according to a wide body of research. There's also evidence to suggest that children adopted internationally could have much higher rates of fetal alcohol syndrome, autism and brain damage, said Dr. Ronald Federici, a clinical neuropsychologist who works with adopted children.”

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Alzheimer's Disease

Books for Adults

Dunn, HankHard Choices for Loving People: CPR, Artificial Feeding, Comfort Care and the Patient with a Life-Threatening Illness

Articles and Other Resources

Support Program Helps Caregivers of Mentally Ill Cope, by Traci Pedersen. Psych Central, June 28, 2011.  “Caring for a family member with mental illness can take its toll, but a widely available education and support program for relatives of the mentally ill called Family-to-Family (FTF) can significantly improve a family's coping ability.”

Drug Found to Thwart Mental Decline, Grow Brain Cells in Rodents, by Cell Press. World Science, July 08, 2010.  “Scientists have discovered a chemical that they say restores memory-forming capacity in aging rats, likely by promoting the survival and growth of new cells in the brain’s memory hub.”

Activity Level Important for Women's Mental Health, by Rick Nauert. Psych Central, July 02, 2010.  “New research finds women can lower their risk of late-life cognitive impairment by performing physical activity.”

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Anger Management

Books for Children and Teens

Aborn, AllysonEverything I Do, You Blame Me
Huebner, DawnWhat to Do When Your Temper Flares: A Kid's Guide to Overcoming Problems With Anger (for ages 9-12)
Moser, AdolphDon't Rant and Rave on Wednesdays!: The Children's Anger-Control Book (for ages 4-8)
Priolo, LouGetting a Grip: The Heart of Anger Handbook for Teens (for young adults)
Seaward, BrianHot Stones and Funny Bones: Teens Helping Teens Cope with Stress and Anger (for young adults)
Shapiro, LawrenceSometime I Like To Fight, I Don't Do It Much Anymore
Slap-Shelton, LauraEvery Time I Blow My Top I Lose My Head
Verdick, ElizabethHow to Take the Grrrr Out of Anger (for ages 9-12)
Wilde, JerryHot Stuff to Help Kids Chill Out: The Anger Management Book (for young adults)

Books for Adults

Brown, Jennifer AnneWhat Angry Kids Need: Parenting Your Angry Child Without Going Mad
Currie, MichaelDoing Anger Differently
Gaynor, Darlyne, et al.Helping Your Angry Child: Worksheets, Fun Puzzles, and Engaging Games to Help You Communicate Better
Golden, BernardHealthy Anger: How to Help Children and Teens Manage Their Anger
Kazdin, Alan E.Parent Management Training: Treatment for Oppositional, Aggressive, and Antisocial Behavior in Children and Adolescents
McKay, Gary D.Calming the Family Storm: Anger Management for Moms, Dads, and All the Kids
Whitehouse, ElianeA Volcano in My Tummy: Helping Children to Handle Anger

Articles and Other Resources

Can a teen’s anger mean a mental disorder?, by Kotz, Deborah. Boston Globe, July 09, 2012.  “While most teens have a violent, angry outburst at some point during their adolescence, nearly 8 percent have regular violent outbursts that would fall into the category of a mental health disorder. That’s according to a Harvard Medical School finding published online last Monday in the Archives of General Psychiatry, one of the first studies to measure the prevalence of the disorder — called intermittent explosive disorder— in teens.”

Is This Teen Angst or an Uncontrollable Anger Disorder?, by Alexandra Sifferlin. Time, July 03, 2012.  “With all those raging hormones, every teenager is bound to "lose it" at one time or another. But a recent study suggests that adolescents' attacks of anger may indicate something more serious than your standard puberty-related mood swings: nearly two-thirds of youth report having had a bout of uncontrollable anger that involved threatening violence, destroying property or engaging in violence toward others, and nearly 8%--or close to 6 million teens--meet the criteria for intermittent explosive disorder (IED), which is characterized by persistent, out-of-control anger attacks that can't be explained by a mental or medical disorder or substance use.”

New Guidelines to Curb Childhood Aggression, by Rick Nauert. June 01, 2012.  “Childhood aggression is a common, yet complex behavior. New recommendations to aid in the care of youth have been released to primary care providers and mental health specialists.”

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Anxiety Disorders

Books for Children and Teens

Brown, MargaretThe Runaway Bunny
Cain, JananThe Way I Feel
Crary, ElizabethI'm Scared
Crary, ElizabethMommy Don't Go
Danneberg, JulieFirst Day Jitters
Davis, Gabriel and Dennen, SueThe Moving Book: A Kids' Survival Guide
Dunn Buron, KariWhen My Worries Get Too Big! A Relaxation Book for Children Who Live with Anxiety
Huebner, DawnSometimes I Worry Too Much, But Now I Know How to Stop
Huebner, Dawn and Matthews, BonnieWhat to Do When You Worry Too Much: A Kid's Guide to Overcoming Anxiety
Huebner, DawnWhat to Do When You Worry Too Much: A Kid's Guide to Overcoming Anxiety (for ages 6 and up)
Penn, AudreyThe Kissing Hand
Shapiro, LawrenceAll Feelings Are Okay
Tompkins, Michael A. and Martinez, Katherine A.My Anxious Mind: A Teen's Guide to Managing Anxiety and Panic
Wilson, Reid and Lyons, LynnAnxious Kids, Anxious Parents: 7 Ways to Stop the Worry Cycle and Raise Courageous and Independent Children (for 8-18)

Books for Adults

Bell, J.Rewind, Replay, Repeat: A Memoir of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder
Bourne, Edmund J., Ph.DThe Anxiety and Phobia Workbook
Buffie, MargaretAngels Turn Their Backs
Colas, EmilyJust Checking: Scenes from the Life of an Obsessive-Compulsive
Foxman, PaulThe Worried Child
Hallowell, EdwardWorry
Rapee, Ronald and Lyneham, Heidi, et al.Helping Your Anxious Child: A Step-by-Step Guide for Parents
Stossel, ScottMy Age of Anxiety: Fear, Hope, Dread, and the Search for Peace of Mind
Wagner, AureenWorried No More
Wilensky, AmyPassing for Normal: A Memoir of Compulsion
Wilson, ReidDon't Panic

Articles and Other Resources

Postpartum Difficulties Not Just Limited to Depression, by Traci Pedersen. Psych Central, August 19, 2014.  ““Both mothers and fathers need to pay attention to their mental health during the perinatal period, and they need to watch for these other types of conditions, not just depression,” said Carrie Wendel-Hummell, a doctoral candidate in sociology. “Anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder, psychosis, and bipolar disorder are all shaped by circumstances that surround having a baby.””

Unexpected death of a loved one linked to onset of psychiatric disorders, by Columbia University. ScienceDaily, May 29, 2014.  “The sudden loss of a loved one can trigger a variety of psychiatric disorders in people with no history of mental illness, according to researchers at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health and colleagues at Columbia's School of Social Work and Harvard Medical School. While previous studies have suggested there is a link between sudden bereavement and an onset of common psychiatric disorders, this is the first study to show the association of acute bereavement and mania in a large population sample.”

In Texting Era, Crisis Hotlines Put Help at Youths’ Fingertips, by Leslie Kaufman. New York Times, February 04, 2014.  “While counseling by phone remains far more prevalent, texting has become such a fundamental way to communicate, particularly among people under 20, that crisis groups have begun to adopt it as an alternative way of providing emergency services and counseling. Texting provides privacy that can be crucial if a person feels threatened by someone near them, counselors say. It also looks more natural if the teenager is in public.”

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Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)

Books for Children and Teens

Fruchter, DeniseOther People
Galvin, MathewOtto Learns about His Medicine: A Story about Medication for Children with ADHD
Gantos, JackJoey Pigza Swallowed the Key
Gehret, JeanneEagle Eyes: A Childs Guide to Paying Attention
Gehret, JeanneI'm Somebody Too
Gordon, MichaelMy Brother is a World Class Pain: A Siblings Guide to ADHD
Hallowell, NedA Walk in the Rain with a Brain
Kraus, JeanCory Stories
Moss, DeborahShelly and the Hyperactive Turtle
Nadeau, KathleenLearning to Slow Down and Pay Attention
Quinn, PatriciaAttention, Girls!: A Guide to Learn All about Your AD/HD
Quinn, Patricia and Judith SternPutting on the Brakes
Shapiro, LawrenceJumping Jake Settles Down
Shapiro, LawrenceSometimes I Drive My Mom Crazy, But I Know She's Crazy About Me
Taylor, JohnThe Survival Guide for Kids with ADD or ADHD
Weiner, EllenTaking ADD to School

Books and Videos for Adults

Alexander-Roberts, ColleenADHD and Teens
Alexander-Roberts, ColleenADHD Parenting Handbook
Amen, DanielHealing ADD
American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP)ADHD: What Every Parent Needs to Know
Barkley, Russell(Video) ADHD in the Classroom ~ Strategies for Teachers
Bender, WilliamUnderstanding ADHD Practical Guide for Teachers
Brown, ThomasAttention Deficit Disorders and Comorbities
CHADDCHADD Information Guide
Dawson, PegSmart but Scattered
Dendy, ChrisTeenagers with ADHD
Dornbush, MarilynTeaching the Tiger
Feingold, BenWhy Your Child is Hyperactive
Greenbaum, JudithHelping Your Adolescent with ADHD & LD
Greenspan, StanleyOvercoming ADHD
Hallowell, EdwardDelivered from Distraction
Hallowell, EdwardDriven to Distraction
Hallowell, Edward and Jensen, Peter S.Superparenting for ADD: An Innovative Approach to Raising Your Distracted Child
Hartmann, ThomComplete Guide to ADHD: Help for Your Family at Home, School and Work
Harvey, ParkerProblem Solvers Guide for Students with ADHD
Harvey, ParkerThe ADD Hyperactivity Workbook for Parents, Teachers, and Kids
Heininger, JanetFrom Chaos to Calm: Effective Parenting for Challenging Children with ADHD and other Behavior Problems
Ingersoll, BarbaraADD and LD
Janes, Rebecca LMHC, LADCGENERATION RX: Kids on Pills- A Parent's Guide
Jensen, PeterMaking the System Work for Your Child with ADHD
Jergen, RobertThe Little Monster- Growing Up with ADHD
Kelly, KateYou Mean I'm Not Lazy, Stupid or Crazy
Kilcarr, PatrickVoices from Fatherhood: Fathers, Sons and ADHD
Kutscher, MartinADHD - Living without Brakes
Martin, KirkCelebrate ADHD
Mooney, JonathonLearning Outside the Lines
Nadeau, KathleenSurvival Guide for College Students with ADD or LD
Nadeau, KathleenUnderstanding Girls with ADHD
Nadeau, KathleenUnderstanding Women with ADHD
Newmark, SanfordADHD Without Drugs
Quinn, PatriciaADD and the College Student: A Guide for High School and College Students
Reif, SandraThe ADHD Book of Lists
Silverman, StephanSchool Success for Kids With ADHD
Taylor, JohnHelping Your Hyperactive/ADD Child
Wiener, CraigParenting your Child with ADHD
Zeigler, ChrisA Bird's Eye View of Life with ADD and ADHD

Articles and Other Resources

Childhood mental health disabilities on the rise, by Val Wadas-Willingham. CNN, August 18, 2014.  “Over the past half century, the prevalence of childhood disabilities in the United States has been on the rise, possibly due to an increased awareness about these issues. Now a study published in this week’s online issue of Pediatrics suggests the nature of those newly diagnosed disabilities is changing. The report, “Changing Trends of Childhood Disability, 2001-2011" found the number of American children with disabilities rose 16% over a 10-year period. While there was a noted decline in physical problems, there was a large increase in disabilities classified as neurodevelopmental conditions or mental health issues, such as ADHD and autism.”

How Childhood Trauma Could Be Mistaken for ADHD, by Rebecca Ruiz. The Atlantic, July 07, 2014.  “Considered a heritable brain disorder, one in nine U.S. children—or 6.4 million youth—currently have a diagnosis of ADHD. In recent years, parents and experts have questioned whether the growing prevalence of ADHD has to do with hasty medical evaluations, a flood of advertising for ADHD drugs, and increased pressure on teachers to cultivate high-performing students. Now Brown and other researchers are drawing attention to a compelling possibility: Inattentive, hyperactive, and impulsive behavior may in fact mirror the effects of adversity, and many pediatricians, psychiatrists, and psychologists don’t know how—or don’t have the time—to tell the difference.”

The Foolproof Way to Improve Your ADHD Child’s Social Skills, by Lisa Aro. Everyday Health, January 21, 2014.  “Impulsiveness, frustration, and impatience can often leads to inappropriate or aggressive behavior. While discipline is important it means nothing in the if end the child hasn’t learned new skills to help them cope with the situations they face every day. Social stories can help you teach your child those skills.”

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Autism Spectrum Disorders/Asperger's Syndrome

Books for Children and Teens

Edwards, AndreannaTaking Autism To School
Gaynot, KateA Friend Like Simon
Lears, LaurieIan's Walk: A Story about Autism
Peete, Holly Robinson and Peete, Ryan ElizabethMy Brother Charlie
Peralta, SarahAll About My Brother
Sabin, EllenThe Autism Acceptance Book: Being a Friend to Someone With Autism
Shally, CelesteSince We're Friends
Thompson, MaryAndy and His Yellow Frisbee
Welton, JudeCan I Tell You About Asperger Syndrome?: A Guide for Friends and Family
Wine, AngelaWhat It Is to Be Me!: An Asperger Kid Book
Wong, AdonyaIn My Mind: The World through the Eyes of Autism

Books and Videos for Adults

Attainment (Video)Straight Talk About Autism: Childhood and Adolescent Issues
Attwood, TonyAspergers Syndrome: A Guide for Parents and Professionals
Bashe, PatriciaThe Oasis Guide to Aspergers Syndrome
Ginsberg, DebraRaising Blaze
Grandin, TempleLabeled Autistic
Grandin, TempleThinking in Pictures
Greenspan, StanleyEngaging Autism
Gutstein, StevenThe RDI Book: Forging New Pathways for Autism, Asperger's and PDD with the Relationship Development Intervention Program
Harris, SandraRight from the Start: Behavioral Intervention for Young Children with Autism
Harris, SandraSiblings of Children with Autism
Klass, PerriQuirky Kids
Koegel, RobertTeaching Children with Autism
McAfee, JeanetteNavigating the Social World
Notbohm, Ellen and Zysk, Veronica1001 Great Ideas for Teaching and Raising Children with Autism or Asperger's
Notbohm, EllenTen Things Every Child with Autism Wishes You Knew
Ozonoff, SallyParents Guide to Aspergers Syndrome and High-Functioning Autism
Park, ClaraExciting Nirvana: A Daughters Life with Autism
Seroussi, KarynUnraveling the Mystery of Autism and Pervasive Developmental Disorder
Sicile-Kira, ChantalAutism Spectrum Disorders
Stewart, KathrynHelping a Child with NVLD or Aspergers Syndrome
Volkmar, FredHealthcare for Children on the Autism Spectrum
Wheeler, MariaToilet Training for Individuals with Autism or Other Developmental Issues
Willey, LianePretending to be Normal Living with Aspergers
Williams, DonnaNobody, Nowhere

Articles and Other Resources

Learning With Disabilities: One Effort To Shake Up The Classroom, by NPR Staff. NPR, April 27, 2014.  “This is what an inclusive classroom looks like: Children with disabilities sit next to ones who've been deemed "gifted and talented." The mixing is done carefully, and quietly. Students don't necessarily know who's working at what level. Despite a court ruling 25 years ago that gave children with disabilities equal access to general education activities, change has been slow. Today, about 17 percent of students with any disability spend all or most of their days segregated. Children with severe disabilities can still expect that separation.”

Autism rates now 1 in 68 U.S. children: CDC, by Miriam Falco. CNN, March 28, 2014.  “One in 68 U.S. children has an autism spectrum disorder (ASD), a 30% increase from 1 in 88 two years ago, according to a new report released Thursday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. This newest estimate is based on the CDC's evaluation of health and educational records of all 8-year-old children in 11 states: Alabama, Wisconsin, Colorado, Missouri, Georgia, Arkansas, Arizona, Maryland, North Carolina, Utah and New Jersey.”

The Foolproof Way to Improve Your ADHD Child’s Social Skills, by Lisa Aro. Everyday Health, January 21, 2014.  “Impulsiveness, frustration, and impatience can often leads to inappropriate or aggressive behavior. While discipline is important it means nothing in the if end the child hasn’t learned new skills to help them cope with the situations they face every day. Social stories can help you teach your child those skills.”

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Bipolar Disorder

Books for Children and Teens

Anglada, TracyBrandon and the Bipolar Bear
Anglada, TracyTurbo Max: a Story for Sibs of Children with Bipolar Disorder
Child Bipolar AssocThe Storm in My Brain
Hebert, BrynaAnger Mountain
Hebert, BrynaMy Bipolar Roller Coaster Feelings Book
Hebert, BrynaMy Bipolar Roller Coaster Feelings Workbook
Lewandowski, LisaDarcy Daisey and the Firefly Festival
Papolos, DemitriJeffrey the Lionhearted

Books for Adults

Berger, L.We Heard the Angels of Madness: A Family Guide to Coping with Manic Depression
Birmaher, BorisNew Hope for Children and Teens with BP
Campbell, B.M.72 Hour Hold
Fristad, MaryRaising a Moody Child
Gibbons, K.Sights Unseen
Jamieson, PatrickMind Race
Jamison, KayAn Unquiet Mind
Lederman, JudithThe Ups and Downs of Raising a Bipolar Child
Lyden, J.Daughter of the Queen of Sheba
Lynn, GeorgeSurvival Strategies for Parenting Children with BP
Milkowitz, DavidThe Bipolar Disorder Survival Guide
Papolas, DemetriThe Bipolar Child
Singer, CindyIf Your Child is Bipolar
Steele, DanielleHis Bright Light: The Story of Nick Traina
Torrey, FullerSurviving Manic Depression
Waltz, MitziBipolar Disorder: A guide to Helping Children

Articles and Other Resources

Duration of undiagnosed bipolar disorder unrelated to treatment response, by Joanna Lyford. August 06, 2014.  “The duration of undiagnosed bipolar disorder is unrelated to patients’ clinical status or their response to mood-stabilising medication, study findings indicate.”

It’s Not Just What You Say, It’s How You Say It, by Aimee Swartz. August 03, 2014.  “Even the savviest city dwellers would be lost in a maze of detours and one-way streets without navigation apps. But what about GPS for your mental health—technology that could navigate the peaks and valleys of bipolar disorder? Yep, there’s an app for that, too.”

Unexpected death of a loved one linked to onset of psychiatric disorders, by Columbia University. ScienceDaily, May 29, 2014.  “The sudden loss of a loved one can trigger a variety of psychiatric disorders in people with no history of mental illness, according to researchers at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health and colleagues at Columbia's School of Social Work and Harvard Medical School. While previous studies have suggested there is a link between sudden bereavement and an onset of common psychiatric disorders, this is the first study to show the association of acute bereavement and mania in a large population sample.”

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Bullying

Books for Children and Teens

BerenstainBerenstain Bears and the Bully
BerenstainBerenstain Bears and the Double Dare
Brunet, KarenSimon's Hook
Dewdney, AnnaLlama Llama and the Bully Goat
Evans, PatriciaTeen Torment: Overcoming Verbal Abuse at Home and at School
Meyer, Stephanie, et al.Bullying Under Attack: True Stories Written by Teen Victims, Bullies & Bystanders
Romain, TrevorBullies are a Pain in the Brain
Zafris, PeterAnton Acts Up (for ages 4 - 8)
Zafris, PeterDot Spots a Surprise Ending (for ages 4 - 8)
Zafris, PeterTiny T Saves the Day (for ages 4 - 8)

Books and Videos for Adults

(Video)Mean Girls
Coloroso, BarbaraThe Bully, the Bullied, and the Bystander: From Preschool to HighSchool--How Parents and Teachers Can Help Break the Cycle
Englander, ElizabethBullying and Cyberbullying
Guerra, Nancy and SmithPreventing Youth Violence in a Multicultural Society
Jacobs, TomTeen Cyberbullying Investigated: Where Do Your Rights End and Consequences Begin?
Kowalski, Robin and Limber, et al.Cyberbullying: Bullying in the Digital Age
Lutzker, JohnPreventing Violence: Research and Evidence-Based Intervention Strategies
Olweus, DanBullying at School: What We Know and What We Can Do
Orpinas, Pamela and HorneBullying Prevention: Creating a Positive School Climate and Developing Social Competence
Savage, Dan and Miller, TerryIt Gets Better: Coming Out, Overcoming Bullying & Creating a Life Worth Living
Simmons, RachelOdd Girl Speaks Out: Girls Write about Bullies, Cliques, Popularity, and Jealousy
Willard, NancyCyberbullying and Cyberthreats: Responding to the Challenge of Online Social Aggression , Threats, and Distress
Wiseman, RosalindBoys, Girls and Other Hazardous Materials
Wiseman, RosalindQueen Bees and Wannabes: Helping Your Daughter Survive Cliques, Gossip, Boyfriends, and Other Realities of Adolescence

Articles and Other Resources

One In Five Workers Has Left Their Job Because Of Bullying, by Kathryn Dill. Forbes, September 18, 2014.  “Nearly one third of workers report having felt bullied at work, according to a study released today by CareerBuilder. Even worse? Roughly 20% ended up leaving their job because of it. The study is based on data from a nationwide survey conducted by Harris Poll of nearly 3,400 full-time, private sector employees throughout various industries and company sizes.”

Bullying: Forget what your mother taught you, by Williams, Carol. Asbury Park Press, July 24, 2014.  “All those ways your mom taught you to deal with bullies — ignore them, walk away, turn the other cheek — they don't seem to work, experts say.”

Ruling In Horrific LGBT Bullying Case Should Be A Wake-Up Call For Congress To Finally Pass SNDA, by Block, Joshua. June 24, 2014.  “A 13-year-old boy named Jon Carmichael killed himself during spring break in 2010.You would think that this kind of bullying is illegal and schools have a responsibility to stop it.”

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Child Abuse and Neglect

Books for Children and Teens

Bean, Barbara and BennettThe Me Nobody Knows: A Guide for Teen Survivors
Conlin, JayanJordan's Story
Evans, PatriciaTeen Torment: Overcoming Verbal Abuse at Home and at School
Fay, JenniferTop Secret- Sexual Assault Information for Teens Only
Hoke, SusanMy Body Is Mine, My Feelings Are Mine
King, KimberlyI Said No! A Kid-to-Kid Guide to Keeping Your Private Parts Private
Loftis, ChrisThe Words Hurt: Helping Children Cope with Verbal Abuse
Spelman, CorneliaYour Body Belongs To You
Starishevsky, JillMy Body Belongs to Me: A book about body safety (for 3-5)
Wachter, OraleeNo More Secrets For Me

Books for Adults

Allender, DanThe Wounded Heart: Hope for Adult Victims of Childhood Sexual Abuse
Aronson Fontes, LisaChild Abuse and Culture: Working with Diverse Families
Bass, Ellen and Davis, LauraThe Courage to Heal: A Guide for Women Survivors of Child Sexual Abuse
Clancy, SusanThe Trauma Myth: The Truth About the Sexual Abuse of Children and Its Aftermath
Fisher, AntwoneFinding Fish: A Memoir
Fraser, SylviaMy Father's House: A Memoir of Incest and of Healing
Hagans, KathrynWhen Your Child Has Been Molested: A Parent's Guide to Healing and Recovery
Pelzer, DaveHelp Yourself: Finding Hope, Courage, And Happiness
Rosenzweig, JanetThe Sex-wise Parent: The Parent's Guide to Protecting Your Child, Strengthening Your Family, and Talking to Kids About Sex, Abu

Articles and Other Resources

Teaching Children to Calm Themselves, by David Bornstein. New York Times, March 19, 2014.  “Children who experience abuse, neglect, severe stress or sudden separation at a young age can be traumatized. Without appropriate adult support, trauma can interfere with healthy brain development, inhibiting children’s ability to make good decisions, use memory or use sequential thought processes to work through problems.”

Orphans' Lonely Beginnings Reveal How Parents Shape A Child's Brain, by Jon Hamilton. NPR, February 24, 2014.  “Parents do a lot more than make sure a child has food and shelter, researchers say. They play a critical role in brain development. More than a decade of research on children raised in institutions shows that "neglect is awful for the brain," says Charles Nelson, a professor of pediatrics at Harvard Medical School and Boston Children's Hospital. Without someone who is a reliable source of attention, affection and stimulation, he says, "the wiring of the brain goes awry." The result can be long-term mental and emotional problems.”

Yelling, threatening parents harm teens' mental health, by Allison Bond. Reuters, December 10, 2013.  “Threatening or screaming at teenagers may put them at higher risk for depression and disruptive behaviors such as rule-breaking, a new study suggests. "The take home point is that the verbal behaviors matter," Annette Mahoney, who worked on the study, said. She's a professor of psychology at Bowling Green State University in Ohio. "It can be easy to overlook that, but our study shows that the verbal hostility is really relevant, particularly for mothers who scream and hit, and for fathers who do either one," Mahoney told Reuters Health.”

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Chronic and Disabling Conditions

Books for Children and Teens

American Cancer SocietyIt Helps to Have Friends
Beran, RoyLearning About Epilepsy
CohnSomeone I Love Has Cancer
Epilepsy FoundationMe and My World
Gosselin, KimTaking Seizure Disorders to School
Kohlenberg, SherrySammy's Mommy Has Cancer
McNeil, OrthoExpressions of Courage
Meyer, DonaldViews From Our Shoes
Parkenson, CarolynMy Mommy Has Cancer
Sherkin-LengerWhen Mommy is Sick
Shriver, MariaQue le Pasa a Timmy?
Shriver, MariaWhat's Wrong With Timmy?
Stuve-DeVitoWe'll Paint the Octopus Red
Weiner, EllenTaking Seizures to School

Books for Adults

Freeman, JohnSeizures and Epilepsy in Childhood
Greenspan, StanleyThe Child with Special Needs
Lavin, JudithSpecial Kids Need Special Parents
Moshe, SolomonParke Davis Manual on Epilepsy
Nowixki, StephenHelping the Child Who Doesn't Fit In
Schachter, StevenThe Brainstorm Family
Schachter, StevenThe Brainstorm Series
Simons, RobinAfter The Tears
Smith, PatriciaChildren with Epilepsy

Articles and Other Resources

Learning With Disabilities: One Effort To Shake Up The Classroom, by NPR Staff. NPR, April 27, 2014.  “This is what an inclusive classroom looks like: Children with disabilities sit next to ones who've been deemed "gifted and talented." The mixing is done carefully, and quietly. Students don't necessarily know who's working at what level. Despite a court ruling 25 years ago that gave children with disabilities equal access to general education activities, change has been slow. Today, about 17 percent of students with any disability spend all or most of their days segregated. Children with severe disabilities can still expect that separation.”

Play Therapy Promotes Emotional Healing in Kids Battling Chronic Illnesses, by Rick Nauert. Psych Central, November 06, 2013.  “A version of play therapy using medically themed toys appears to help chronically ill children and their siblings express fears and foster hope for recovery. The innovative project, reported in the journal Issues in Comprehensive Pediatric Nursing, primarily focused on chronically ill children and their siblings who were staying at the Ronald McDonald House in Cincinnati, Ohio.”

Study offers clues about how athletes' brain disease begins, by Stephanie Smith. CNN, August 22, 2013.

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Depression

Books for Children and Teens

Andrews, BethWhy Are You So Sad? : A Child's Book about Parental Depression
Berry, JoyLet's Talk About Feeling Sad
Campbell, BebeSometimes My Mommy Gets Angry
Khalsa, KathyTaking Depression to School
Ratcliffe, JaneSometimes I get Sad (But Now I Know What Makes Me Happy)

Books for Adults

Beardslee, WilliamWhen a Parent is Depressed
Beauboeuf-Lafontant, TamaraBehind the Mask of the Strong Black Woman: Voice and the Embodiment of a Costly Performance
Casey, N.Unholy Ghost: Writers on Depression
Ingersoll, BarbaraLonely, Sad and Angry
Manassis, KatharinaHelping Your Teenager Beat Depression
Manning, M.Undercurrents: A Therapist's Reckoning with her Own Depression
Nicholson, Joanne, et al.Parenting Well When You Are Depressed
Oconnor, RichardUndoing Depression
Papolas, DemetriOvercoming Depression
Raeburn, PaulAcquainted with the Night
Real, TerrenceI Don't Want to Talk About It: Overcoming the Secret Legacy of Male Depression
Riley, DouglasThe Depressed Child: Parents Guide for Rescuing Kids
Shields, BrookeDown Came the Rain
Slater, LaurenProzac Diary
Slater, LaurenWelcome to My Country
Stroll, AndrewThe Omega-3 Connection
Styron, W.Darkness Visible: A Memoir of Madness
Wurtzel, ElizProzac Nation

Articles and Other Resources

Single Dose of Antidepressant Changes the Brain, by Janice Wood. Psych Central, September 19, 2014.  “Just one dose of an antidepressant is enough to produce dramatic changes in the brain, according to a new study. While SSRIs are among the most widely prescribed antidepressants worldwide, it’s still not entirely clear how they work, according to researchers. The drugs are believed to change brain connectivity, but over a period of weeks, not hours, researchers noted. The new study shows that changes begin to take place right away.”

10 Depression Myths We Need To Stop Believing, by Alena Hall. Huffington Post, September 03, 2014.  “In recent weeks, the global conversation surrounding death by suicide has taken center stage, and now more than ever, we're acknowledging the effects of undiagnosed, untreated and mistreated depression on those rising numbers. Approximately two out of three people who commit suicide suffer from major depression first. In the past, we have spent more time focusing on suicide than on this dominant root cause. And that's finally changing. Here are 10 myths and misconceptions about depression that hinder us from truly understanding the disease.”

Postpartum Difficulties Not Just Limited to Depression, by Traci Pedersen. Psych Central, August 19, 2014.  ““Both mothers and fathers need to pay attention to their mental health during the perinatal period, and they need to watch for these other types of conditions, not just depression,” said Carrie Wendel-Hummell, a doctoral candidate in sociology. “Anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder, psychosis, and bipolar disorder are all shaped by circumstances that surround having a baby.””

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Divorce

Books for Children and Teens

Blitzer-Field, MaryMy Life Turned Upside Down, But I Turned It Right Side Up
Brown, MarcDinosaurs Divorce
Christiansen, C.B.My Mother's House, My Father's House
Girard, LindaWalvoordAt Daddy's on Saturdays
Helmering, Doris WildI Have Two Families
Spelman, Cornelia MaudeMamma and Daddy Bear's Divorce

Books for Adults

Beyer, Roberta JDSpeaking of Divorce
Joselow, BethWhen Divorce Hits Home
Robboy, AnitaAftermarriage: The Myth of Divorce
Wolf, AnthonyWhy Did You Have to Get a Divorce?

Articles and Other Resources

Everything we think we know about being the child of divorce is wrong, by Danielle Teller, M.D. and Astro Teller. July 31, 2014.  “It is common knowledge that research studies have demonstrated the harmful effects of divorce on children. Surprisingly, that common knowledge turns out not to be supported by evidence. Although proponents of marriage would like us to believe that kids with divorced parents have more emotional, academic and psychological problems than they would have had if their parents had stayed together, no credible data exist to back up those claims.”

Persistent Sleep Problems after Divorce Need Attention, by Rick Nauert, Ph.D. Psych Central, July 18, 2014.  “University of Arizona researchers have discovered that prolonged sleep problems after a divorce may be associated with hypertension. Experts cite a growing body of research that links divorce to significant negative health effects and even early death, yet few studies have looked at why that connection may exist.”

Divorce Can Impact Children's Weight, by Lauren Gaines. Parenting Magazine, July 01, 2014.  “Parents often worry about their children's emotional well-being when going through a divorce, but new research suggests they should be concerned for their physical health, too. A study published in the online journal BMJ Open found that children of divorced parents were more likely to be overweight or obese.”

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Eating Disorders

Books for Children and Teens

Sears, WilliamEat Healthy Feel Good

Books and Videos for Adults

Adderholdt, MiriamPerfection
Byrne, KatherineA Parents Guide to Anorexia and Bulimia
Costin, CarolynThe Eating Disorder Sourcebook
Freedman, RitaBody Love
Gilbert, SarahThe Unofficial Guide to Managing Eating Disorders
Goodman, LauraEating Disorders: The Journey to Recovery Workbook
Hall, LindseyBulimia: A Guide to Recovery
Hirschmann, JaneOvercoming Overeating
Hirschmann, JanePreventing Childhood Eating Problems
Hirschmann, JaneWhen Women Stop Hating Their Bodies
Kolodny, NancyThe Beginners Guide to Eating Disorder
Matz, JudithBeyond a Shadow of a Diet
Normandi, CarolOver It
NOVA~PBS (Video)Dying to be Thin
Phillips, KatherineThe Broken Mirror
Pipher, MaryHunger Pains
Roth, GeneenBreaking Free From Compulsive Eating
Roth, GeneenWhy Weight?
Saker, IraDying to be Thin
Schaefer, JenniLife Without Ed
Sell, ChristinaYoga from the Inside Out
Shelley, RosemaryAnorexics on Anorexia
Siegel, MecheleSurviving an Eating Disorder
Thopson, BeckyA Hunger So Wide So Deep
Tribole, EvelynIntuitive Eating
Villapiano, MonaEating Disorders: Time for Change
Zerbe, KathrynBody Betrayed

Articles and Other Resources

Brain cells can suppress appetite, study in mice shows, by Smitha Mundasad. BBC, July 27, 2014.  “Scientists have discovered a central hub of brain cells that may put the brakes on a desire to eat, a study in mice shows. And switching on these neurons can stop feeding immediately, according to the Nature Neurosciences report. Researchers say the findings may one day contribute to therapies for obesity and anorexia.”

Fueled by social media, ‘thigh gap’ focus can lure young women to eating disorders, by Amanda Mascarelli. Washington Post, June 30, 2014.  “Anne Becker has been studying eating disorders for nearly three decades, but it was from her twin 13-year-old daughters that she learned the term “thigh gap.” Her daughters got their Seventeen magazine and pulled up Web site images to show Becker, a psychiatrist and eating disorders specialist at Harvard Medical School, what a thigh gap looks like. “They said kids at school talk about it offhandedly like, ‘Well, you have a thigh gap, so you can have the extra ice cream,’ ” Becker says. This disturbing ultra-thin-body trend pressures women and girls to achieve a gap between the thighs when they stand with their feet touching.”

In Texting Era, Crisis Hotlines Put Help at Youths’ Fingertips, by Leslie Kaufman. New York Times, February 04, 2014.  “While counseling by phone remains far more prevalent, texting has become such a fundamental way to communicate, particularly among people under 20, that crisis groups have begun to adopt it as an alternative way of providing emergency services and counseling. Texting provides privacy that can be crucial if a person feels threatened by someone near them, counselors say. It also looks more natural if the teenager is in public.”

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Forensic Psychology

Books for Adults

and Robinson, DanielWild Beasts and Idle Humors: The Insanity Defense from Antiquity to the Present
Hazelwood, Roy and Michaud, StephenDark Dreams: A Legendary FBI Profiler Examines Homicide and the Criminal Mind
Kupers, Terry and Toch, HansPrison Madness: The Mental Health Crisis Behind Bars and What We Must Do About It
Ramsland, KatherineThe Forensic Psychology of Criminal Mind
Winslade, William and Ross, JudithThe Insanity Plea: The Uses & Abuses of the Insanity Defense

Articles and Other Resources

Thousands of prisoners treated for mental illness, by Johnson, Kevin. USA Today, July 24, 2014.  “The nation's largest prison system has spent more than $36.5 million on psychotropic drugs to treat thousands of offenders in the past four years, according to federal Bureau of Prisons data supplied to USA TODAY.”

Shooting Unfairly Links Violence With Mental Illness — Again, by Shapiro, Joseph. NPR, April 03, 2014.  “With the Army's disclosure that Army Spc. Ivan Lopez was being evaluated for post-traumatic stress disorder before he went on a shooting rampage Wednesday, there were once again questions about whether the Army could have prevented the violence at Fort Hood. Experts in mental health say (even as about Lopez emerge) that it's highly unlikely the violence could have been predicted. Just raising that question, psychologists and psychiatrists say, shows how much Americans misunderstand the link between mental illness and violence.”

Inmates With Mental Illnesses Neglected Inside Toughest U.S. Prison, by Pete Earley. October 09, 2013.  “More horror stories are surfacing about prisoners with mental illnesses allegedly being abused and neglected inside the federal government’s most secretive maximum security penitentiary.”

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Grief and Loss

Books for Children and Teens

Brown, Marc and Krasny Brown, LaurieWhen Dinosaurs Die: A Guide to Understanding Death
Davis, Gabriel and Dennen, SueThe Moving Book: A Kids' Survival Guide
Durant, AlanAlways and Forever
Thomas, PatI Miss You: A First Look at Death
White, E.B.Charlotte's Web
WigglesworthPenny Bears' Gift of Love
Wilhelm, HansI'll Always Love You

Books for Adults

Davis Konigsberg, RuthThe Truth About Grief: The Myth of Its Five Stages and the New Science of Loss
Guest, JudithOrdinary People
Heiney, SueCancer in the Family: Helping Children Cope with a Parent
Horsley, Gloria and Horsley, HeidiTeen Grief Relief: Parenting with Understanding Support and Guidance
Kubler-Ross, ElisabethOn Children and Death
Kubler-Ross, ElisabethOn Death and Dying
Kubler-Ross, ElisabethQuestions and Answers on Death and Dying
Neeld, Elizabeth7 Choices: Finding Daylight After Loss Shatters Your World
Requarth, MargoAfter a Parent's Suicide: Helping Children Heal
Russel, NeilCan I Still Kiss You?

Articles and Other Resources

Unexpected death of a loved one linked to onset of psychiatric disorders, by Columbia University. ScienceDaily, May 29, 2014.  “The sudden loss of a loved one can trigger a variety of psychiatric disorders in people with no history of mental illness, according to researchers at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health and colleagues at Columbia's School of Social Work and Harvard Medical School. While previous studies have suggested there is a link between sudden bereavement and an onset of common psychiatric disorders, this is the first study to show the association of acute bereavement and mania in a large population sample.”

In Texting Era, Crisis Hotlines Put Help at Youths’ Fingertips, by Leslie Kaufman. New York Times, February 04, 2014.  “While counseling by phone remains far more prevalent, texting has become such a fundamental way to communicate, particularly among people under 20, that crisis groups have begun to adopt it as an alternative way of providing emergency services and counseling. Texting provides privacy that can be crucial if a person feels threatened by someone near them, counselors say. It also looks more natural if the teenager is in public.”

Societal Expectations Help Shape Grief, by Rick Nauert. Psych Central, April 22, 2013.  “New research suggests the way society relates to people who have suffered a loss is important to the way the grieving process is managed. University of Haifa scientists propose that people who have never suffered the loss of a loved one tend to believe that the bereavement process has a far more destructive and devastating effect on a person compared to those who have actually suffered such a loss in the past.”

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Hoarding

Books and Videos for Adults

Curry, Arwen and Tanner, Cerissa(Video) Stuffed : A Documentary Film
Montag, Kris Britt(Video) Packrat
Neziroglu, Fugen and Bubrick, Jerome, et al.Overcoming Compulsive Hoarding
Steketee, Gail and Frost, RandyCompulsive hoarding and acquiring: Therapist Guide
Steketee, Gail and Frost, RandyCompulsive hoarding and acquiring: Workbook
Tolin, David and Frost, Randy, et al.Buried in Treasures : Help for compulsive acquiring, saving and hoarding
Tompkins, Michael and Hartl, TamaraDigging Out : Helping your loved one manage clutter, hoarding and compulsive acquiring

Articles and Other Resources

Children of Hoarders on Leaving the Cluttered Nest, by Steven Kurutz. New York Times, May 11, 2011.  “Children of hoarders often display a tortured ambivalence toward their parents, perhaps because unlike spouses or friends of hoarders, they had little choice but to live amid the junk.”

Tools to Reduce Stigma of Mental Illness, by Rick Nauert. Psych Central, May 14, 2010.  “Researchers have announced a new intervention that can improve the quality of life and self-esteem among persons with serious mental illness.”

A Clutter Too Deep for Mere Bins and Shelves, by Tara Parker-Pope. New York Times, January 01, 2008.  “Disorganization may be a person problem, not a house problem.”

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Homelessness

Books for Children and Teens

Davis, Gabriel and Dennen, SueThe Moving Book: A Kids' Survival Guide

Books for Adults

Agness, PhyllisNo Place at the Table
Hopper, KimReckoning With Homelessness
Jencks, ChristopherThe Homeless
Lachenmeyer, N.The Outsider: A Journey into My Father's Struggle with Madness
Liebow, ElliotTell Them Who I Am: The Lives of Homeless Women
Walsh, MaryMoving to Nowhere: Children's Stories of Homelessness

Articles and Other Resources

Mayor Walsh Aims to End Homelessness Among Boston’s Veterans by 2015, by Zeninjor Enwemeka. July 09, 2014.  “The “Boston Homes for the Brave” initiative seeks to house 400 homeless veterans in the city, the mayor’s office announced today.”

Hotels becoming long-term housing for homeless families, by MyFoxBoston.com. February 23, 2014.  “Living in a budget hotel room is supposed to be temporary housing for homeless families, but new information released by the state shows that nearly 400 homeless families have been living in hotels – free of charge – for more than a year, with some families living in hotels since 2011.”

Homelessness: Cheaper to Fix Than to Let Fester, by James, Charley. July 19, 2012.  “It costs (government) about $40,000 a year for a homeless person to be on the streets. That works out to roughly $110 a night, or more expensive than staying in a budget motel along the interstate.”

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Internet and Media Safety

Books for Adults

Carr, NicholasThe Shallows: What the Internet Is Doing to Our Brains
Mayer-Schönberger, ViktorDelete: The Virtue of Forgetting in the Digital Age
Steyer, JamesThe Other Parent: The Inside Story of the Media's Effect on Our Children
Turkle, SherryAlone Together: Why We Expect More from Technology and Less from Each Other

Articles and Other Resources

Have you had the 'sext' talk with your kids?, by Geetha Parachuru. CNN, June 30, 2014.  “It’s called sexting, the act of sending and/or receiving sexually explicit text or photo messages via your mobile phone. And one in five middle school-aged students are doing it, according to a new study published in the medical journal Pediatrics. Among the 1,285 Los Angeles students aged 10 to 15 surveyed for the study, 20% reported having received at least one sext, while 5% reported having sent at least one sext.”

Phone app keeps recovering alcoholics from falling off the wagon, by Deborah Kotz. March 27, 2014.  “Recovering alcoholics who used an experimental smart phone app had a far easier time avoiding alcohol for up to a year after they left rehab compared to those who didn’t use the app. That’s based on a new trial involving nearly 350 recovering alcoholics, which found that those randomly assigned to use the app had an average of 1.4 binge drinking days per month — consuming three or four alcoholic beverages in two hours — compared to 2.8 days for those who didn’t get the app. The users of the app, called A-CHESS, were also 22 percent more likely to maintain their abstinence from alcohol, according to the study published on Wednesday in the journal JAMA Psychiatry.”

Less Sleep, More Time Online Raise Risk For Teen Depression, by Maanvi Singh. NPR, February 06, 2014.  “The teenage years are a tumultuous time, with about 11 percent developing depression by age 18. Lack of sleep may increase teenagers' risk of depression, two studies say. Teenagers who don't get enough sleep are four times as likely to develop as their peers who sleep more, according to researchers at the University of Texas Health Science Center in Houston.”

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Learning Disabilities and Differences

Books for Children and Teens

Gehret, JeanneThe Don't Give Up Kid
Levine, MelAll Kinds of Minds
Moynihan, LaurenTaking Dyslexia To School
Stern, JudithMany Ways To Learn

Books and Videos for Adults

Alliance for TechnologyComputer Resources for People with Disabilities
Anderson, WinfredNegotiating the Special Education Maze
Beil, LindseyRaising a Sensory Smart Child
Capper, LizanneThat's My Child
Citro, AllissaTransitional Skills for Post Secondary Success
Citro, TeressaThe Experts Speak
Dornbush, MarilynTeaching the Tiger
Jamison, KayExuberance the Passion for Life
Kranowitz, CarolThe Out of Sync Child
Kranowitz, CarolThe Out of Sync Child Has Fun
Kranowitz, Carol (Video)(Video) The Out of Sync Child
Lavoie, Richard(Video) Learning Disabilities and Social Skills-last one picked, first one...
Lavoie, Richard(Video) Understanding Learning Disabilities: How difficult can this be?
Lee, ChristopherFaking It: Look into the mind of a creative learner
Lelewer, NancySomething is Not Right
Levine, Mel(Video) Misunderstood Minds
Levine, MelA Mind at a Time
Levine, MelAll Kinds of Minds
Levine, MelKeeping Ahead in School
Levine, MelThe Myth of Laziness
Mangrum, CharlesCollege with Programs for Students with LD
Markova, DonnaHow Your Child is Smart
National Research CounselStarting Out Right
Shaywitz, SallyOvercoming Dyslexia
Silver, LarryThe Misunderstood Child
Stewart, KathrynHelping a Child with NVLD or Aspergers Syndrome
Tanguay, PamelaNonverbal Learning Disabilities at Home
Tanguay, PamelaNonverbal Learning Disabilities at School
Thompson, SueThe Source for Nonverbal Learning Disabilities
Turrie, CherylChallenging Voices
Whitley, MichaelBright Minds, Poor Grades

Articles and Other Resources

Predicting Dyslexia — Even Before Children Learn to Read, by Rachel Zimmerman. May 23, 2014.  “New research shows it’s possible to pick up some of the signs of dyslexia in the brain even before kids learn to read. And this earlier identification may start to substantially influence how parents, educators and clinicians tackle the disorder.”

Learning With Disabilities: One Effort To Shake Up The Classroom, by NPR Staff. NPR, April 27, 2014.  “This is what an inclusive classroom looks like: Children with disabilities sit next to ones who've been deemed "gifted and talented." The mixing is done carefully, and quietly. Students don't necessarily know who's working at what level. Despite a court ruling 25 years ago that gave children with disabilities equal access to general education activities, change has been slow. Today, about 17 percent of students with any disability spend all or most of their days segregated. Children with severe disabilities can still expect that separation.”

Teens with Learning Disabilities Benefit from Closer Relationships, by Rick Nauert, Ph.D. Psych Central, April 29, 2013.  “Many kids with learning disabilities also face social and emotional challenges, which in adolescence can lead to depression, anxiety and isolation.”

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Military Families

Books for Children and Teens

Andrews, BethI Miss You!: A Military Kid's Book About Deployment
Davis, Gabriel and Dennen, SueThe Moving Book: A Kids' Survival Guide
Ehrmantraut, BrendaNight Catch
Hoyt, Carmen R.Daddy's in Iraq, but I Want him Back
Skolmoski, StephanieA Paper Hug

Books for Adults

Hoge, CharlesOnce a Warrior - Always a Warrior: Navigating the Transition from Combat to Home
Military Family Network (MFN)Your Military Family Network: Your Connection to Military Friendly Businesses, Resources, Benefits, Information and Advice
Pavlicin, KarenLife After Deployment: Military families share reunion stories and advice
Pavlicin, KarenSurviving Deployment: A Guide for Military Families

Articles and Other Resources

Military Dads Have to Re-Learn Parenting After Deployment University of Wisconsin-Madison, March 04, 2014.  “Fathers who returned after military service report having difficulty connecting with young children who sometimes don’t remember them, according to a study released this week. While the fathers in the study had eagerly anticipated reuniting with their families, they reported significant stress, especially around issues of reconnecting with children, adapting expectations from military to family life, and co-parenting.”

Military deployments tied to teens' depression, by Kathleen Raven. Reuters, November 29, 2013.  “Adolescents who experience the deployment of a family member in the U.S. military may face an increased risk of depression, suggests a new study. Ninth- and eleventh-grade students in California public schools with two or more deployment experiences over the past decade were 56 percent more likely to feel sad or hopeless compared with their non-military-family peers, the researchers found. The same kids were 34 percent more likely to have suicidal thoughts.”

Mental Illness, Not Combat, Causes Soldier's Suicides, by Jen Christensen. CNN, August 06, 2013.  “The record number of military suicides seen in recent years may not be directly due to extended deployments or combat experience, according to a new study. This data analysis, funded by the Department of Defense, suggests that the real reason behind the growing number of military suicides is underlying mental health issues in this population”

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Multiculturalism

Books for Children and Teens

Heather, AlexanderA Child's Introduction to the World: Geography, Cultures, and People - From the Grand Canyon to the Great Wall of China
Nayer, JudyAt the Park
Pollock, David C. and Van Reken, Ruth E.Third Culture Kids: Growing Up Among Worlds
Reynolds, JanThis Is My Home
Sanders, Nancy I.A Kid's Guide to African American History: More than 70 Activities (A Kid's Guide series)
Tatum, Beverly DanielWhy Are All the Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria: And Other Conversations About Race (for 16+)
Taylor, GayliaFirst Day of School
Taylor-Butler, ChristineWhat Time Is It?

Books for Adults

Alexander, MichelleThe New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness
Aronson Fontes, LisaChild Abuse and Culture: Working with Diverse Families
Coyhis, Don L.Understanding Native American Culture: Insights for Recovery Professionals and Other Wellness Practitioners
Fernando, SumanMental Health, Race and Culture: Third Edition
Frankenburg, RuthWhite Women, Race Matters: The Social Construction of Whiteness (Gender, Racism, Ethnicity)
MacDonald, M.All Souls: A Family Story from Southie
Mason, B.In Country
Zacharoff, M.D,, Kevin L. and Zeis, Joanne, et al.Cross-Cultural Pain Management: Effective Treatment of Pain in the Hispanic Population

Articles and Other Resources

Redefining Race Relations: It Begins at Home, by Erlanger Turner. American Psychological Assosciation, September 18, 2014.  “In the United States, race relations has had its challenges across history. Although strides have been made over the course of history, we continue to battle racism and injustice in the 21st century. The recent incident in Ferguson, Missouri has re-energized efforts to address race relations, racism, and discrimination. If you’ve been avoiding media or hiding from technology, CNN has provided information on their website detailing the events and current status.”

Mayor Walsh Aims to End Homelessness Among Boston’s Veterans by 2015, by Zeninjor Enwemeka. July 09, 2014.  “The “Boston Homes for the Brave” initiative seeks to house 400 homeless veterans in the city, the mayor’s office announced today.”

The power of prejudice -- and why you should speak up, by Amanda Enayati. CNN, February 06, 2014.  “Indeed, admits Rattan, "people talk about all the ways that the Internet's anonymity can lead to more prejudice being expressed online." But a series of studies Rattan undertook with her colleague, the late Nalini Ambady of Stanford University, showed that social media also have the potential to serve as the exact opposite.”

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Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD)

Books for Children and Teens

Foster, ConstanceKids Like Me
Hesser, TerryKissing Doorknobs (Teens)
Huebner, DawnWhat to Do When You Worry Too Much:A Kid's Guide
Huebner, DawnWhat to Do When Your Brain Gets Stuck:A Kid's Guide
March, JohnTalking Back to OCD: The Program That Helps Kids and Teens Say "No Way" -- and Parents Say "Way to Go"
Moritz, E. Katia and Jablonsky, JenniferBlink, Blink, Clop, Clop: Why Do We Do Things We Can't Stop? An OCD Storybook
Pinto, AureenUp and Down the Worry Hill

Books for Adults

Bell, J.Rewind, Replay, Repeat: A Memoir of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder
Chansky, Tamar E.Freeing Your Child from Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: A Powerful, Practical Program for Parents of Children and Adolescents
Colas, EmilyJust Checking: Scenes from the Life of an Obsessive-Compulsive
Fitzgibbons, Lee and Pedrick, CherleneHelping Your Child With OCD: A Workbook for Parents of Children With Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder
Foa, EdnaStop Obsessing!: How to Overcome your Obsessions and Compulsions (Revised Edition)
Foust, TraciNowhere Near Normal: A Memoir of OCD
Gravitz, HerbertObsessive Compulsive Disorder-New Help for the Family
Hyman, Bruce and Pedrick, CherleneThe OCD Workbook: Your Guide to Breaking Free from Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder
March, John and Mulle, KarenOCD in Children and Adolescents: A Cognitive-Behavioral Treatment Manual
Neziroglu, Fugen and Yaryura-Tobias, Jose A.Over and Over Again: Understanding Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder
Summers, MarcEverything in Its Place
Wagner, AureenWhat To Do When Your Child has Obsessive Compulsive Disorder
Wilensky, AmyPassing for Normal: A Memoir of Compulsion

Articles and Other Resources

In Texting Era, Crisis Hotlines Put Help at Youths’ Fingertips, by Leslie Kaufman. New York Times, February 04, 2014.  “While counseling by phone remains far more prevalent, texting has become such a fundamental way to communicate, particularly among people under 20, that crisis groups have begun to adopt it as an alternative way of providing emergency services and counseling. Texting provides privacy that can be crucial if a person feels threatened by someone near them, counselors say. It also looks more natural if the teenager is in public.”

Wariness on Surgery of the Mind, by Benedict Carey. New York Times, February 14, 2011.  “In recent years, many psychiatrists have come to believe that the last, best chance for some people with severe and intractable mental problems is psychosurgery, an experimental procedure in which doctors operate directly on the brain.”

Predicting Treatment Success for Child OCD, by Rick Nauert. Psych Central, October 18, 2010.  “A new research effort may help clinicians better predict how a child with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) will respond to some of the most commonly used treatment approaches.”

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Parenting Advice and Support

Books for Children and Teens

Ryan, AmyVibes (for ages 14-16 years)
Verdick, ElizabethWords Are Not for Hurting (for ages 4-7 years)

Books for Adults

Gallagher, Gina and Konjoian, PatriciaShut Up About...Your Perfect Kid!
Pruett, Kyle and PruettPartnership Parenting
Seligman, MartinThe Optimistic Child : A Proven Program to Safeguard Children Against Depression and Build Lifelong Resilience

Articles and Other Resources

Preschool Depression May Continue for a Decade, by Rick Nauert. Psych Central, July 31, 2014.  “New research discovers early childhood depression increases the risk that a child will be depressed throughout their formative school years. Washington University researchers discovered children who had depression as preschoolers were 2.5 times more likely to suffer from the condition in elementary and middle school than kids who were not depressed at very young ages.”

Divorce Can Impact Children's Weight, by Lauren Gaines. Parenting Magazine, July 01, 2014.  “Parents often worry about their children's emotional well-being when going through a divorce, but new research suggests they should be concerned for their physical health, too. A study published in the online journal BMJ Open found that children of divorced parents were more likely to be overweight or obese.”

Have you had the 'sext' talk with your kids?, by Geetha Parachuru. CNN, June 30, 2014.  “It’s called sexting, the act of sending and/or receiving sexually explicit text or photo messages via your mobile phone. And one in five middle school-aged students are doing it, according to a new study published in the medical journal Pediatrics. Among the 1,285 Los Angeles students aged 10 to 15 surveyed for the study, 20% reported having received at least one sext, while 5% reported having sent at least one sext.”

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Post-traumatic Stress Disorder

Books for Children and Teens

Andrews, BethWhy Are You So Scared?: A Child's Book About Parents With PTSD
Dunn Buron, KariWhen My Worries Get Too Big! A Relaxation Book for Children Who Live with Anxiety

Books for Adults

Cori, Jasmin LeeHealing from Trauma: A Survivor's Guide to Understanding Your Symptoms and Reclaiming Your Life
Handy, MarlaNo Comfort Zone: Notes on Living with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder
Hoge, CharlesOnce a Warrior - Always a Warrior: Navigating the Transition from Combat to Home
Monahon, CynthiaChildren and Trauma:A Parent's Guide to Helping Children Heal
Orange, CynthiaShock Waves: A Practical Guide to Living with a Loved One's PTSD
Schiraldi, GlennThe Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Sourcebook: A Guide to Healing, Recovery, and Growth
Williams, Mary Beth and Poijula, SoiliThe PTSD Workbook: Simple, Effective Techniques for Overcoming Traumatic Stress Symptoms

Articles and Other Resources

How Childhood Trauma Could Be Mistaken for ADHD, by Rebecca Ruiz. The Atlantic, July 07, 2014.  “Considered a heritable brain disorder, one in nine U.S. children—or 6.4 million youth—currently have a diagnosis of ADHD. In recent years, parents and experts have questioned whether the growing prevalence of ADHD has to do with hasty medical evaluations, a flood of advertising for ADHD drugs, and increased pressure on teachers to cultivate high-performing students. Now Brown and other researchers are drawing attention to a compelling possibility: Inattentive, hyperactive, and impulsive behavior may in fact mirror the effects of adversity, and many pediatricians, psychiatrists, and psychologists don’t know how—or don’t have the time—to tell the difference.”

A Revolutionary Approach to Treating PTSD, by Jeneen Interlandi. New York Times, May 22, 2014.  “Bessel van der Kolk wants to change the way we heal a traumatized mind — by starting with the body. He suggests, 'if we can help our patients tolerate their own bodily sensations, they’ll be able to process the trauma themselves.’”

Teaching Children to Calm Themselves, by David Bornstein. New York Times, March 19, 2014.  “Children who experience abuse, neglect, severe stress or sudden separation at a young age can be traumatized. Without appropriate adult support, trauma can interfere with healthy brain development, inhibiting children’s ability to make good decisions, use memory or use sequential thought processes to work through problems.”

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Postpartum Depression

Books for Adults

Bennett, ShoshanaBeyond the Blues: Prenatal and Postpartum Depression
Huysman, ArleneA Mother's Tears: Understanding the Mood Swings That Follow Childbirth
Kleiman, KarenThe Postpartum Husband - Practical Solutions for living with Postpartum Depression
Kleiman, KarenThis Isn't What I Expected: Overcoming Postpartum Depression
Misri, SheilaShouldn't I be Happy: Emotional Problems of Pregnant and Postpartum Women
Placksin, SallyMothering the New Mother: Women's Feelings and Needs After childbirth A Resource and Support Guide
Roan, Sharon L.Postpartum Depression - Every Woman's Guide to diagnosis, Treatment, and Prevention
Shields, BrookeDown Came the Rain

Articles and Other Resources

Postpartum Difficulties Not Just Limited to Depression, by Traci Pedersen. Psych Central, August 19, 2014.  ““Both mothers and fathers need to pay attention to their mental health during the perinatal period, and they need to watch for these other types of conditions, not just depression,” said Carrie Wendel-Hummell, a doctoral candidate in sociology. “Anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder, psychosis, and bipolar disorder are all shaped by circumstances that surround having a baby.””

Looking after New Mothers, by New York Times. New York Times, June 19, 2014.  “A dozen states have laws that encourage some form of awareness and education about postpartum depression. In three of those states--New Jersey, Illinois, and West Virginia--screening is required by law. Should screening for postpartum depression be mandatory? How can those suffering be assured of treatment?”

Thinking of Ways to Harm Her, by Pam Belluck. New York Times, June 15, 2014.  “Postpartum depression isn't always postpartum. It isn't even always depression. A fast-growing body of research is changing the very definition of maternal mental illness, showing that it is more common and varied than previously thought. Scientists say new findings contradict the longstanding view that symptoms begin only within a few weeks after childbirth. In fact, depression often begins during pregnancy, researchers say,and can develop any time in the first year after a baby is born.”

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Psychosis

Books for Children and Teens

Friedman, MichelleEverything You Need to Know About Schizophrenia (for 12)
Olson, LaurieHe Was Still My Daddy: Coming to Terms With Mental Illness

Books for Adults

Bartok, MiraThe Memory Palace: A Memoir
Cockburn, Patrick and CockburnHenry's Demons: Living with Schizophrenia, A Father and Son's Story
Deveson, A.Tell Me I'm Here: One Family's Experience of Schizophrenia
Holman, V.Rescuing Patty Hearst: Memoirs From a Decade Gone Mad
Lachenmeyer, N.The Outsider: A Journey into My Father's Struggle with Madness
Nasrala, HenryThe Patient with Schizophrenia
Neugeboren, J.Imagining Robert: My Brother, Madness, and Survival: A Memoir
Saks, E.R.The Center Can Not Hold: My Journey Through Madness
Schiller & Bennett, L. & A.The Quiet Room
Sheehan, S.Is There No Place on Earth for Me?
Simon, C.Mad House: Growing Up in the Shadow of Mentally Ill Siblings
Slater, LaurenWelcome to My Country
Steele, DanThe Day the Voices Stopped
Torray, ESurviving Schizophrenia
Torrey, E. FullerSurviving Schizophrenia: A Manual for Families, Patients, and Providers
Wagner & Spiro, P.S. & C.Divided Minds: Twin Sisters and Their Journey Through Schizophrenia

Articles and Other Resources

What makes psychotic teens more at risk for suicide than other groups with psychosis?, by Case Western Reserve. PsyPost, April 24, 2014.  “Suicide is a general risk for people with psychosis. According to The Journal of Psychiatry, 20 percent to 40 percent of those diagnosed with psychosis attempt suicide, and up to 10 percent succeed. And teens with psychotic symptoms are nearly 70 times more likely to attempt suicide than adolescents in the general population, according to a 2013 study in JAMA Psychiatry.”

Schizophrenia: Talking therapies moderately effective, by James Gallagher. BBC, February 05, 2014.  “Cognitive behavioral therapy is an officially recommended treatment, but is available to less than 10% of patients in the UK with schizophrenia. A study published in the Lancet indicates CBT could help the many who refuse antipsychotic medication. Experts say larger trials are needed.”

Stray Prenatal Gene Network Suspected in Schizophrenia, by National Institute of Mental Health. National Institute of Mental Health, August 01, 2013.

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Rape and Sexual Assault

Books for Children and Teens

Bean, Barbara and BennettThe Me Nobody Knows: A Guide for Teen Survivors
Girard, Linda WalvoordMy Body Is Private
Kehoe, Patricia and DeachSomething Happened and I'm Scared to Tell: A Book for Young Victims of Abuse
Kleven, Sandy, et al.The Right Touch: A Read-Aloud Story to Help Prevent Child Sexual Abuse
Starishevsky, JillMy Body Belongs to Me: A book about body safety (for 3-5)

Books for Adults

Allender, DanThe Wounded Heart: Hope for Adult Victims of Childhood Sexual Abuse
Bass, Ellen and Davis, LauraThe Courage to Heal: A Guide for Women Survivors of Child Sexual Abuse
Braswell, LindaQuest for Respect: A Healing Guide for Survivors of Rape
Davis, LauraAllies in Healing: When the Person You Love Was Sexually Abused As a Child, A Support Book
Hagans, KathrynWhen Your Child Has Been Molested: A Parent's Guide to Healing and Recovery
Lew, Mike and BassVictims No Longer: Men Recovering from Incest and Other Sexual Child Abuse
Raine, NancyAfter Silence: Rape & My Journey Back
Sebold, AliceLucky: A Memoir
Warshaw, RobinI Never Called It Rape: The Ms. Report on Recognizing, Fighting, and Surviving Date and Acquaintance Rape

Articles and Other Resources

It's getting safer to be a child in the U.S., by Jen Christensen. CNN, May 01, 2014.  “Despite all the national headlines about school shootings and other violence, life has actually gotten a lot safer for American children, according to a new study. Instances in which children were the victims of crimes such as assaults or violence such as bullying have declined significantly, according to the study, which appears in the most recent edition of the JAMA Pediatrics. Researchers compared rates of 50 different types of violence and crime over time. Of those categories, 27 saw significant declines between 2003 and 2011.”

Exposure therapy aids teens with PTSD, study finds, by Geoffrey Mohan. Los Angeles Times, December 24, 2013.  “Teens who have been sexually traumatized benefit more from therapy that includes recounting the assault than from supportive counseling, a study suggests. Such exposure treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder has had some success among adults. But it has not found favor for treatment of teens because of fear that it could exacerbate symptoms for young adults who have not developed robust coping skills.”

Breaking the Silence, by Matthew Hay Brown. The Sun, December 14, 2013.  “The outrage over sexual assault in the military has focused largely on female service members, and with reason: A woman in uniform is much likelier to be targeted than a man, Pentagon surveys indicate. But because male service members greatly outnumber females, officials believe the majority of sexual assault victims — 53 percent in 2012 — are men. These men — an estimated 13,900 last year alone — are far less likely than women to report an attack. Only 13 percent of reports last year were filed by men, military data show.”

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Relationship Violence

Books for Children and Teens

Davis, DianeSomething Is Wrong At My House
Hochban, TyHear My Roar: A Story of Family Violence

Books for Adults

Amin, RenairDomestically Cursed: A Story On Partnership Violence
Bancroft, LundyWhen Dad Hurts Mom: Helping Your Children Heal the Wounds of Witnessing Abuse
Bancroft, LundyWhy Does He Do That?: Inside the Minds of Angry and Controlling Men
Cooke, KazEscaping Control & Abuse: How to Get Out of a Bad Relationship & Recover from Assault
Dugan, Meg and Hock, RogerIt's My Life Now: Starting Over After an Abusive Relationship or Domestic Violence
MacDonald, M.All Souls: A Family Story from Southie
Weiss, ElaineFamily and Friends' Guide to Domestic Violence: How to Listen, Talk and Take Action When Someone You Care About is Being Abused
Weiss, ElaineSurviving Domestic Violence: Vioces of Women Who Broke Free

Articles and Other Resources

Study: Financial Education Key For Domestic Violence Survivors, by Jeltsen, Melissa. Huffington Post, July 24, 2014.  “Marina A. has no bruises or scars from the abuse she suffered at the hands of her husband. That is, unless you look at her bank account. “My husband was in total control of the money,” she told The Huffington Post at a conference on financial abuse Wednesday. “At times, he let me have a debit card but he would tell me where and when I could use it. Other times, he would borrow it and 'lose' it, leaving me with nothing. I couldn’t drive. I had no money to call a cab. I was stuck.””

‘I’m a Survivor of Rape and Intimate Partner Violence–And I’m a Man’, by Kelly, John. Time, July 02, 2014.  “The topic of campus rape has been making its way to Congress and the White House, and coverage of this issue has increasingly been making headlines. But conspicuously absent from the conversation is the narrative of male and queer survivors.”

Teens trained to spot drama before it turns dangerous, by Emanuella Grinberg. CNN, June 25, 2013.  “The goal is to challenge perceptions of "normal behavior" and make teens aware of the nuanced interactions that create a hostile climate. It could be as simple as diverting a friend's attention when he hollers at a girl on the street, encouraging your sister to talk to her boyfriend instead of secretly checking his texts, sneaking off to call 911 when the popular guys start messing with a girl who's barely conscious. "Bystander intervention gives everyone a role to play in preventing relationship violence," said University of New Hampshire psychology professor Victoria Banyard, whose research has examined bystander intervention in relationship violence prevention programs.”

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Self Injury

Books for Adults

Alderman, TracyThe Scarred Soul: Understanding and Ending Self-Inflicted Violence
Conterio, Karen and Lader, Wendy, et al.Bodily Harm: The Breakthrough Healing Program for Self-Injurers
Favazza, ArmandoBodies under Siege: Self-mutiliation and Body Modification in Culture and Psychiatry
Gratz, KimFreedom from Self-Harm: Overcoming Self-Injury with Skills from DBT and Other Treatments
Hollander, Ph.D., MichaelHelping Teens Who Cut: Understanding and Ending Self Injury
Holmes, AnnCutting the Pain Away
Kettlewell, C.Skin Game: A Cutter's Memoir
Khemlami-Patel, Ph.D., Sony and Mcvey-Noble, Ph.D., Merry, Neziroglu, Ph.D., FugenWhen Your Child is Cutting: A Parent's Guide to Helping Children Overcome Self-Injury
Levenkron, StevenCutting: Understanding Self Mutilation
Miller, Ed.D., DustyWomen Who Hurt Themselves: A Book Of Hope And Understanding
Shapiro, Ph.D., Lawrence E.Stopping the Pain: A Workbook for Teens Who Cut & Self Injure
Strong, MarileeA Bright Red Scream: Self-Mutilation and the Language of Pain

Articles and Other Resources

How to Recognize Teens at Risk for Self-Harm, by Janice Wood. Psych Central, October 06, 2012.  “It's a startling statistic: Suicide is the third-leading cause of death for teens, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In response, a University of Missouri public health expert has identified factors that will help parents, medical professionals and educators recognize teens at risk for self injury and suicide.”

Girls with ADHD and self-harm/suicide risk, by Traci Pedersen. Psych Central, August 16, 2012.  “As girls with ADHD become adults, they are especially prone toward internalizing their problems and feelings of inadequacy--that in turn can lead to self-injury and even attempted suicide, according to new findings from the University of California, Berkeley.”

Expert on Mental Illness Reveals Her Own Fight, by Benedict Carey. New York Times, June 23, 2011.  “No one knows how many people with severe mental illness live what appear to be normal, successful lives, because such people are not in the habit of announcing themselves. They are too busy juggling responsibilities, paying the bills, studying, raising families - all while weathering gusts of dark emotions or delusions that would quickly overwhelm almost anyone else. Now, an increasing number of them are risking exposure of their secret, saying that the time is right.”

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Sexual Orientation

Books for Children and Teens

Harris, RobieIt's Perfectly Normal
Madaras, LyndaMy Body, Myself For Boys
Mayle, PeterWhat's Happening To Me?
Mayle, PeterWhere Did I Come From?
Potash, MarlinAm I Weird or Is This Normal?

Books for Adults

Griffin, WrithBeyond Acceptance
Hoyle, SallyThe Sexualized Child in Foster Care
Huegel, KellyGLBTQ:The Survival Guide for Queer and Questioning Teens
Sanchez, AlexRainbow Boys
Sanchez, AlexRainbow High

Articles and Other Resources

Brain's reaction to male odor shifts at puberty in children with gender dysphoria, by Frontiers. ScienceDaily, May 28, 2014.  “The brains of children with gender dysphoria react to androstadienone, a musky-smelling steroid produced by men, in a way typical of their biological sex, but after puberty according to their experienced gender, finds a study for the first time. Around puberty, the testes of men start to produce androstadienone, a breakdown product of testosterone. Men release it in their sweat, especially from the armpits. Its only known function is to work like a pheromone: when women smell androstadienone, their mood tends to improve, their blood pressure, heart rate, and breathing go up, and they may become aroused.”

In Texting Era, Crisis Hotlines Put Help at Youths’ Fingertips, by Leslie Kaufman. New York Times, February 04, 2014.  “While counseling by phone remains far more prevalent, texting has become such a fundamental way to communicate, particularly among people under 20, that crisis groups have begun to adopt it as an alternative way of providing emergency services and counseling. Texting provides privacy that can be crucial if a person feels threatened by someone near them, counselors say. It also looks more natural if the teenager is in public.”

5 things to know about gender identity, by Jacque Wilson. CNN, August 23, 2013.  “"Transgender is an umbrella term for persons whose gender identity, gender expression, or behavior does not conform to that typically associated with the sex to which they were assigned at birth," according to the American Psychological Association. "Gender identity refers to a person's internal sense of being male, female, or something else." Some say the roots of gender identity issues are cultural -- that how a culture views a "boy" or "girl" and what they should or should not do contributes to gender issues. Others believe being transgender is a choice or a psychological problem. Some experts have hypothesized that exposure to hormones during pregnancy can lead to a baby's transgender identity since early research has shown androgens can affect fetal brain development.”

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Sport Psychology

Books for Adults

Beilock, SianChoke
Ehrmann, JoeInSideOut Coaching: How Sports Can Transform Lives
Gallwey, W. TimothyThe Inner Game of Tennis: The Classic Guide to the Mental Side of Peak Performance
Ginsberg, Richard and Durant, Stephen, et al.Whose Game Is It Anyway? A Guide to Helping Your Child Get the Most from Sports, Organized by Age and Stage
Lardon, MichaelFinding Your Zone: Ten Core Lessons for Achieving Peak Performance in Sports and Life
Loehr, JamesThe New Toughness Training for Sports: Mental Emotional Physical Conditioning from One of the World's Premier Sports Psychologi
Lynch, JerryThe Way of the Champion: Lessons from Sun Tzu's The art of War and other Tao Wisdom for Sports & life
Weinberg, RobertFoundations of Sport and Exercise Psychology

Articles and Other Resources

Taking notice of the hidden injury, by Nicole Noren. ESPN, January 26, 2014.  “According to the most recent data compiled by the NCAA, suicide was the third-leading cause of death of student-athletes from 2004-08, after accidents and cardiac causes.”

Study offers clues about how athletes' brain disease begins, by Stephanie Smith. CNN, August 22, 2013.

Exercise Can Help Protect Against Future Emotional Stress, by Janice Wood. Psych Central, September 14, 2012.  “Exercise may help people cope with anxiety and stress for an extended period of time after the workout, according to a new study. Researchers compared how moderate intensity cycling for 30 minutes versus a 30-minute period of rest affected anxiety levels in a group of healthy college students.”

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Stress

Books for Children and Teens

Aborn, AllysonEverything I Do, You Blame Me
Allen, Jeffrey and KleinReady...Set...Relax - A Research Based Program of Relaxation, Learning, and Self Esteem for Children
Berry, JoyA Children's Book About Lying
Brown, MargaretThe Runaway Bunny
Cain, JananThe Way I Feel
Crary, ElizabethI'm Scared
Crary, ElizabethMommy Don't Go
Danneberg, JulieFirst Day Jitters
Gilmore, RachnaA Screaming Kind of Day
Penn, AudreyThe Kissing Hand
Seaward, Brian and Bartlett, LindaHot Stones & Funny Bones: Teens Helping Teens Cope with Stress & Anger
Shapiro, LawrenceAll Feelings Are Okay
Slap-Shelton, LauraEvery Time I Blow My Top I Lose My Head

Books for Adults

Beilock, SianChoke
Benson, HerbertThe Relaxation Response
Kabat-Zin, JohnFull Catastrophic Living
Sapolsky, RobertWhy Zebras Don't Get Ulcers: A Guide to Stress

Articles and Other Resources

New Research Shows Why Some People Are More Vulnerable to Stress, by Janice Wood. Psych Central, August 02, 2014.  “A new study may explain why some people are more vulnerable to stress and stress-related psychiatric disorders.”

Why You Are So Stressed About Stress, by Anna Altman. New York Times, July 16, 2014.  “NPR conducted a study about how stressed out we are as a country, and the results, released last week, show that one in four Americans reported feeling stressed in the last month and one in two has experienced a major stressful event in the last year.”

In Texting Era, Crisis Hotlines Put Help at Youths’ Fingertips, by Leslie Kaufman. New York Times, February 04, 2014.  “While counseling by phone remains far more prevalent, texting has become such a fundamental way to communicate, particularly among people under 20, that crisis groups have begun to adopt it as an alternative way of providing emergency services and counseling. Texting provides privacy that can be crucial if a person feels threatened by someone near them, counselors say. It also looks more natural if the teenager is in public.”

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Substance Abuse and Addictions

Books for Children and Teens

Elliot, Zetta and Strickland, ShadraBird

Books for Adults

AnonymousGo Ask Alice
Beattie, MelodyCo-Dependant No More
Burroughs, A.Dry: A Memoir
Cheever, S.Notes Found in a Bottle: My Life as a Drinker
Conyers, BeverlyAddict In the Family
Coyhis, Don L.Understanding Native American Culture: Insights for Recovery Professionals and Other Wellness Practitioners
Frey, JamesA Million Little Pieces
Girlow, StuartSubstance Abuse Disorders
Hamill, P.A Drinking Life
Hoffman, JohnAddiction;Why Can't They Just Stop
Jay, DeborahNo More Letting Go
Knapp, C.Drinking: A Love Story
KuhnBuzzed-the Straight Facts about the most used and abused drugs
Lachenmeyer, N.The Outsider: A Journey into My Father's Struggle with Madness
Marlowe, A.How to Stop Time: Heroin from A to Z
McGovern, G.Terry: My Daughter's Life and Death Struggle with Alcoholism
Sheff, DavidBeautiful Boy: A Father's Journey Through His Son's Addiction
Verghese, A.The Tennis Partner
Volkmann, Chris&TorenFrom Binge to Blackout
Walls, JeannetteThe Glass Castle
Zailckas, KorenSmashed- story of a drunk girlhood

Articles and Other Resources

Study finds brain changes in young marijuana users, by Kay Lazar. Boston Globe, April 15, 2014.  “Young adults who occasionally smoke marijuana show abnormalities in two key areas of their brain related to emotion, motivation, and decision making, raising concerns that they could be damaging their developing minds at a critical time, according to a new study by Boston researchers. Other studies have revealed brain changes among heavy marijuana users, but this research is believed to be the first to demonstrate such abnormalities in young, casual smokers.”

Phone app keeps recovering alcoholics from falling off the wagon, by Deborah Kotz. March 27, 2014.  “Recovering alcoholics who used an experimental smart phone app had a far easier time avoiding alcohol for up to a year after they left rehab compared to those who didn’t use the app. That’s based on a new trial involving nearly 350 recovering alcoholics, which found that those randomly assigned to use the app had an average of 1.4 binge drinking days per month — consuming three or four alcoholic beverages in two hours — compared to 2.8 days for those who didn’t get the app. The users of the app, called A-CHESS, were also 22 percent more likely to maintain their abstinence from alcohol, according to the study published on Wednesday in the journal JAMA Psychiatry.”

One snapshot in a tragic national picture: Long Island sees exploding heroin use, by Ronnie Berke and Poppy Harlow. CNN, February 09, 2014.  “Heroin use has exploded in what is being described as an epidemic on New York's Long Island, where addiction counselors are seeing users as young as 12 -- many from middle-class, suburban families. Several factors have contributed to this "perfect storm" of addiction according to experts -- among them, proximity to major airports and transportation centers, and a statewide crackdown on prescription painkillers, that has had the unintended effect of pushing more kids to cheaper and more accessible heroin.”

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Suicide

Books for Adults

Cobain, BeverlyDying to Be Free: A Healing Guide for Families After a Suicide
Fine, CarlaNo Time to Say Goodbye: Surviving The Suicide Of A Loved One
Guest, JudithOrdinary People
Hsu, Albert Y.Grieving a Suicide: A Loved One's Search for Comfort, Answers & Hope
Jamison, KayNight Falls Fast: Understanding Suicide
Lukas, Christopher and Seiden, HenrySilent Grief: Living in the Wake of Suicide
Quinnett, PaulSuicide: The Forever Decision
Requarth, MargoAfter a Parent's Suicide: Helping Children Heal
Savoie, LaurieThe Ripple Effect: Invisible Impact of Suicide

Articles and Other Resources

World Suicide Prevention Day, 2014, by John Grohol. Psych Central, September 10, 2014.  “Every day around the world, families and friends grieve the loss of a loved one due to suicide. Not once. Not twice. But over 2,000 times per day someone takes their own life. Can you imagine? If Ebola took 2,000 people’s lives per day, we’d hear a world outcry and an immediate call to action. But since it’s just suicide, we turn a blind eye. We go on with our merry lives, and pretend it couldn’t happen to us. It couldn’t possibly happen to someone we know.”

Mental Health Care System Is Failing At Suicide Prevention, Advocates Say, by Alana Horowitz. Huffington Post, September 03, 2014.  “Nearly 40,000 people die from suicide in the U.S. every year -- a number that has climbed recently. CDC data show that in the first decade of the millennium, the suicide rate among U.S. adults rose 28 percent. As researchers told The New York Times last year, this figure may be even higher due to under-reporting. a pending piece of legislation in California that would mandate suicide prevention training for all licensed mental health professionals, including psychologists, social workers and even marriage counselors. Such a requirement is startlingly rare: Only two other states have laws similar to the proposed California bill, despite evidence that suggests such training can lower rates of suicide among at-risk groups.”

Could a blood test predict suicides?, by Matthew Stucker and John Bonifield. CNN, July 30, 2014.  “Approximately 36,000 deaths are caused by suicide each year in the United States. What if a simple blood test could one day help prevent that from happening? In a new small study, researchers were able to predict who had experienced suicidal thoughts or attempted suicide just by looking at their blood. The experimental test was over 80% accurate.”

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Teen Pregnancy and Parenting

Books for Children and Teens

Lindsay, JeanneTeen Dads: Rights, Responsibilities & Joys (for Adolescents)
Lindsay, Jeanne and Brunelli, JeanYour Pregnancy & Newborn Journey: A Guide for Pregnant Teens (for Adolescents)
Williams, HeidiTeen Pregnancy (Issues That Concern You) (for Adolescents)

Articles and Other Resources

MTV’s ‘16 and Pregnant,’ Derided by Some, May Resonate as a Cautionary Tale, by Annie Lowrey. New York Times, January 13, 2014.  “A new economic study of Nielsen television ratings and birth records suggests that the show she appeared in, “16 and Pregnant,” and its spinoffs may have prevented more than 20,000 births to teenage mothers in 2010. The paper, to be released Monday by the National Bureau of Economic Research, makes the case that the controversial but popular programs reduced the teenage birthrate by nearly 6 percent, contributing to a long-term decline that accelerated during the recession.”

Doctors don’t talk to adolescents about sex, by Stephanie Smith. CNN, December 31, 2013.  “Thirty-six seconds is the average time a physician spends speaking with adolescent patients about sexuality, according to research published online Monday in JAMA Pediatrics. About one-third of adolescent patient-doctor interactions result in no talk at all about sexuality - which includes things like sexual activity, dating and sexual orientation.”

Postpartum Depression: When Moms Feel Out of Control, by Elizabeth Landau. CNN, May 14, 2010.  “It's normal for new mothers to feel overwhelmed and tired, but sometimes those feelings can develop into something more serious. "Baby blues," which do not require medical attention, can include mood swings, sleep problems, irritability, crying, anxiety and sadness in the first couple of weeks after birth. Postpartum depression is more intense and intrusive: Women may lose interest in life, withdraw from family and friends, or think about harming themselves or their children.”

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Trauma and Resiliency

Books for Children and Teens

Cohn, JaniceWhy Did It Happen?: Helping Children Cope in a Violent World
Davis, Gabriel and Dennen, SueThe Moving Book: A Kids' Survival Guide
Durant, AlanAlways and Forever
Elliot, Zetta and Strickland, ShadraBird
Federico, Julie K.Some Parts are NOT for Sharing
Gellman, MarcAnd God Cried Too: A Kid's Book of Healing and Hope.
Holmes, Margaret M. and Mudlaff, Sasha J.A Terrible Thing Happened
Shuman, CarolJenny Is Scared: When Sad Things Happen in the World
Straus, Susan FarberHealing Days: A Guide for Kids Who Have Experienced Trauma
Watts, GillianHear My Roar: A Story of Family Violence

Books for Adults

Angelou, M.I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings
Britton, Kathryn and Maymin, SeniaResilience: How to Navigate Life's Curves
Brooks, Robert and Goldstein, SamRaising Resilient Children
Cohen-Sandler, RoniStressed-Out Girls: Helping Them Thrive in the Age of Pressure
Cori, Jasmin LeeHealing from Trauma: A Survivor's Guide to Understanding Your Symptoms and Reclaiming Your Life
Groves, Betsy McAlisterChildren Who See Too Much
Hallowell, EdwardThe Childhood Roots of Adult Happiness
MacDonald, M.All Souls: A Family Story from Southie
Monahon, CynthiaChildren and Trauma:A Parent's Guide to Helping Children Heal
Perry, Bruce and SzalavitzThe Boy Who Was Raised as a Dog: And Other Stories from a Child Psychiatrist's Notebook--What Traumatized Children Can Teach Us
Rogers, A.A Shining Affliction: A Story of Harm and Healing in Psychotherapy
Wolin, Steven and Wolin, SybilThe Resilient Self: How Survivors of Troubled Families Rise Above Adversity.

Articles and Other Resources

How Childhood Trauma Could Be Mistaken for ADHD, by Rebecca Ruiz. The Atlantic, July 07, 2014.  “Considered a heritable brain disorder, one in nine U.S. children—or 6.4 million youth—currently have a diagnosis of ADHD. In recent years, parents and experts have questioned whether the growing prevalence of ADHD has to do with hasty medical evaluations, a flood of advertising for ADHD drugs, and increased pressure on teachers to cultivate high-performing students. Now Brown and other researchers are drawing attention to a compelling possibility: Inattentive, hyperactive, and impulsive behavior may in fact mirror the effects of adversity, and many pediatricians, psychiatrists, and psychologists don’t know how—or don’t have the time—to tell the difference.”

Unexpected death of a loved one linked to onset of psychiatric disorders, by Columbia University. ScienceDaily, May 29, 2014.  “The sudden loss of a loved one can trigger a variety of psychiatric disorders in people with no history of mental illness, according to researchers at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health and colleagues at Columbia's School of Social Work and Harvard Medical School. While previous studies have suggested there is a link between sudden bereavement and an onset of common psychiatric disorders, this is the first study to show the association of acute bereavement and mania in a large population sample.”

A Revolutionary Approach to Treating PTSD, by Jeneen Interlandi. New York Times, May 22, 2014.  “Bessel van der Kolk wants to change the way we heal a traumatized mind — by starting with the body. He suggests, 'if we can help our patients tolerate their own bodily sensations, they’ll be able to process the trauma themselves.’”

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Disclaimer: Material on the MSPP INTERFACE® Referral Service website is intended as general information. It is not a recommendation for treatment, nor should it be considered medical or mental health advice. The MSPP INTERFACE® Referral Service urges families to discuss all information and questions related to medical or mental health care with a health care professional.